Restaurants of the Month: Ganges

When you arrive in a marina town, one of the tough decisions is where to dine. Keeping a crew happy with the right selection is an art. Should you prepare an outstanding meal on the boat after visiting a farmers market, or sample some of the local flavor through their restaurants? In Ganges, it is…

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Tommy T: A Hoot of a Time on the Hummingbird Pub Bus

Tommy Transit, or Tommy T for short, is the most entertaining bus driver you’ll ever have. Tommy T. and his bus. Many years ago, after a couple of tough turns in his life, he decided what he really wanted to do was drive a transit bus in Vancouver, B.C. He ended up driving one for…

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Foodie Heaven: Salt Spring Island

Salt Spring Island has been foodie heaven since the late 1800s.  Back then, Hope Bay was the ferry landing for boats that took fresh produce grown on the island to the markets in Vancouver. Salt Spring has always been known for its laid-back vibe. The 60s and 70s never left Salt Spring and there are…

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Mark Bunzel’s Cruising Report #7

August 15 – Ladysmith to Thetis This morning we took a quick tour of Ladysmith and had a meeting with Tom Irwin, the executive director of the Ladysmith Maritime Museum. This group is amazing and over 200 volunteers strong. Where else can you find a community run marina that is this much fun? The place…

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Restaurant of the Month: Penny’s Palapa

After a long day of cruising, sometimes you just want to sit down to a great meal without having to go far from the harbor. When you arrive in Nanaimo, it is hard to beat Penny’s Palapa, conveniently located on a float amongst the moored boats. It is a popular place and rather than wait…

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Whiskey Golf: The Reality

During our morning weather check, I noted that Whiskey Golf would be active. When it was our time to cross from Lasqueti Island to Nanaimo, we set a course for the Ballenas Islands. From there we could take the safe corridor in front of Winchelsea Island. We didn’t expect a better-than-television show, complete with an…

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Report #5: Barkley Sound

Flexibility may be the most important characteristic of a successful cruise. Flexibility means you move when the weather is right and the boat is ready. It means prioritizing safety and comfort over schedules. Confidence is also critical. Confidence in the boat, her systems, and her maintenance. Confidence in your ability to navigate, problem solve, and…

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Restaurant of the Month: Nimmo Bay Resort

Nimmo Bay Wilderness Resort The Ultimate Experience on the Inside Passage For years, boaters were discouraged from visiting Nimmo Bay. Some report pulling up to the docks and being practically shoed away. The Nimmo Bay Resort facilities were usually full with heli-fishing guests, and they did not have the facilities to accommodate boating visitors. Fraser…

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New WA State BUI Law

Washington State has just enacted a new boating under the influence (BUI) law that substantially increases penalties for operating a boat while intoxicated. BUI is now a gross misdeameanor, rather than simply a misdemeanor. Penalties for BUI are now up to a $5000 fine and/or 364 days in jail If an officer with probable cause…

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Gear Review: RAM Mounts

My iPad is one of the most useful devices on the boat. The chart plotting apps are so useful, in fact, that I use it as a second plotter almost all the time. One of the challenges of this is keeping the iPad secure, especially aboard a small boat. My solution? The RAM (Round-a-Mount) Mount.…

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Report #4: Estevan Point and Clayoquot Sound

“West coast Vancouver Island south: wind northwest 25-35 knots; seas 3-4 meters.” At 4:30 am, this isn’t the forecast I want to hear. My goal is to make it around Estevan Point, from Friendly Cove in Nootka Sound to Hot Springs Cove in Clayoquot Sound. But the weather doesn’t seem to be cooperating. The news…

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Profile: Lorraine Williams, Sointula

“I’ve seen a lot of change over the years,” says Lorraine Williams, Harbour Manager in Sointula. “I remember when the docks were empty in summer because all the boats were fishing. If there was one sailboat in the harbor, it was a big deal.” She estimates that now an average of 140 boats per day…

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