Bunk SoxI love it when a product like Bunk Sox comes along that makes me say “why didn’t I think of that?” My boat has a v-berth, and I have never found a way to keep the sheets straight. Traditional fitted sheets don’t work and flat sheets tucked in become loose and wrinkled, and they usually bunch up on one side of the bed. The result–you end up sleeping directly on the mattress.

In trying to resolve the problem, I ordered expensive custom-made fitted sheets that cinched up with a drawstring on the side, but it didn’t work well. Then I was introduced to the Bunk Sox; it is like a tube sock for your boat mattress.

What’s great about Bunk Sox? It slips on easily and is made of a machine-washable, cotton/poly knit blend fabric, almost like a jersey that breathes and doesn’t get clammy in damp weather. The cotton keeps cool in the summer and the poly knit keeps warm in the winter.

Bunk SoxBunk Sox Basics

  1. Fits as the bottom sheet for odd-sized and triangular boat mattresses.
  2. Comfortable jersey material stretches around the mattress, so it does not come undone.
  3. Comes in three sizes for $49.95 – Order here

Bunk Sox Sizes

Bunk Sox is available in three convenient sizes:

  • Narrow Bunk (24″-30″ with length to 80″)
  • Twin/Single (30″-40″ with length to 80″)
  • Full/double (40″-50″ with length to 80″)
  • Works for a v-berth wide foot, quarter berth round or ended berth.

It is currently only available in gray, but I hear that navy is in the works. At $49.95 USD each, Bunk Sox is priced reasonably and available at the Waggoner eStore. It is also in the process of being rolled out to select chandleries in the US and Canada.

Remember, Coco Chanel got her start in jersey because she felt that women could live in it, breathe in it and feel comfortable. Can’t argue with that.

 

―Missy Gervais

Missy Gervais grew up boating on Vancouver Island near Cowichan Bay and spent countless hours floating around the Gulf Islands watching killer whales. She graduated from the University of Victoria, moved to Vancouver, and spent the last 30 years as a Corporate Administrator for both public and private companies. She has worked with Mustang Survival, volunteered with the RCM-SAR, and for the past five years has been working with Pacific Yacht Systems. Missy spends her spare time cruising on her 34-ft power boat, writing about boating and blogging at missygoesboating.com

 

 

 

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  • Gayle

    Hi Missy, love your blog. What is the difference between a single and twin size Bunk Sox?
    Gayle

    • orders@fineedge.com

      Hello Gayle. A twin is 39″ wide and a single is slightly narrower. Both twin and single would require a 30″-40″ Bunk Sox.